Not My Idea

It wasn’t my idea that water come in raindrops.
They aren’t very convenient and arrive unannounced.
The weather person gives his best guess when I turn on my television,
but if a butterfly does a barrel roll
all bets are off.

It’s an unpredictable world
and thank God for it.
It’s an unpredictable world
though we think we can.
It’s an unpredictable world
and I trust Him,
though I’m not always in on the divine plan.

Avoid tainted water.
Avoid declassified ads.
Avoid mono-sodium glutimawhatzit.
Now doesn’t that last sound awful bad?
Are we to avoid negative ions?
Or are the positive ones what we should fear?
It’s no wonder some folks just check out and have a beer.

But even though…
It’s an unpredictable world
with its bulging waistline,
and earthquakes and storms and huge floods,
I’ve got faith that even if I don’t, God has this,
so I continue to pray and worship and trust.
It’s an unpredictable world, but that’s okay.
God knows whats going on.
God, I trust.

© Joel Tipple
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My love, my bike.

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I’m not spokes to be in love
with my bicycle
It’s not natural
or the norm
In fact I see nothing about my bike that resembles the female form
So I suppose it’s a friend kind of love
that I feel about my Trek
even though you can’t say it’ll come rolling
when I call and beck
Still we’ve shared many miles
and weather
and time
and I’m sure many other things
that probably don’t rhyme
It’s a good relationship
that pays healthy dividends
Let’s all lift an electrolyte filled water bottle
in lieu of that champagne glass.

© Joel Tipple

First Rain & Ninja Umbrella Surfing

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I suppose technically this isn’t really the first rain of the season. But these are the first decent sized drops we’ve experienced in our neck of the woods in some time. In our part of Northern California (read Oregon/Washington, not that place with the sun and beaches) this Summer has been nice in the extreme, so nice in fact that we’ve been issuing warnings to non-natives to not get used to it. We’re low on water right now so we’re grateful to see any precipitation. But what does one do when that deluge comes along and you’re caught out in it with no umbrella? The answer isn’t carrying an umbrella all of the time. Instead, become a Ninja Umbrella Surfer!

There’s a tactic I use when caught by the first rain.
It isn’t because I can’t stand being wet or that I’m vain.
But invariably when the heavens begin their leaking
I have to resort to what I call Ninja Umbrella Surfing.
It works best on city streets where there’s likely to be a crowd.
Frankly, in smaller locales it’s generally not allowed.
You find a fairly friendly looking vict…, I mean, person, holding a
good sized umbrella and start up a conversation, pretending you’re
a normal fella (or lady. Our program is not sexist). Continue
the discourse, keeping a weather eye, being ready to move on to
another umbrella, should you lose the one you originally caught.
Ninja Umbrella Surfing. Why carry your own umbrella?

© Joel Tipple

All Right

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Some days
I dunk my head in a cup of coffee.
It doesn’t have to be any way but hot.
By the time
I’ve sipped it down I’m feeling more ready
for whatever wonky things this day brings.

The clatter of leaves blowing in like fall
brings news of changing weather. Change is coming.
But it didn’t ask me, didn’t ask me, didn’t ask me.
But it’s all right.

It’s all right and I’ll just roll right into heaven.
No reason to stop just cause this life ain’t cake.
It’s all right all day and into evenin’.
It’s all what God gives you and it’s surely what you make.
It’s all right.

© Joel Tipple

Outage

Photo by Urban Wall Art & Murals
Photo by Urban Wall Art & Murals

This memory could really go along with yesterday’s post, and is probably a familiar one to most of you, those moments when the power goes out.

I have a vivid memory of riding home from the little store. The little store was just that, little. It was a very small gas station with a tiny grocery store attached to a home. I suppose at one time there were many more “little stores” in the United States. Corner grocery stores. Actually, we live down the street from my in-laws, and on their block there was once a little store, too. Their dog would ask to go by himself to get a treat there. They would open their front door and he would go to the store by himself, collect a small Tootsie Roll from the proprietor, gobble it up, and go back home.

Okay, back to the ride home. It’s funny that I would make much of the ride. It only amounted to a few blocks. A few blocks in a small town, I might add. The wind reminded me of the wind Dorothy experiences on her way back into her house, before she gets the bump on her head, falls back into her bed and flies off to Oz. As I tacked my faux Sting Ray bike into the wind, already bits of debris, such as asphalt roofing, were slapping across the road. Shortly after I got home, the power went out. The next day, something like half the barns in our county were down, at least all the barns that were were due to go down, if you know what I mean. The point of my story, though, was not the little store, or even the storm. It was more the quiet after the power went out. Candles, food heated on the Franklin Stove, board games, no TV, talking. A good memory created when a minor inconvenience became a night of reliving a simpler time.